Saturday, 20 May 2017

The Sabbatical Is Over



            My last blog post was indeed over a year ago, 12th May 2016.  I found myself asking, “What is the purpose of my blog?  What is the theme I want to focus on? 
I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was thirteen years old.  It was a few months after I fell in love with Jesus and the desire was born in my heart. 
            Now the thing is, my father wanted to be a writer as well.  But he’d had his dreams destroyed in 1968-1969.  I remember that a man came to visit my father regarding a manuscript that Dad had submitted.  The man was either an agent or an editor.  He said my father had written drivel.  Instead of persevering, Dad gave up.  At this stage of my life I know that there were other factors involved in Dad’s decision.  Dad stuck with what he knew—barbering.  My dad was a great barber.
            It made me sad all those years ago to know that dad had given up his dreams.  He was a natural born story teller.  He had many anecdotes that I wish I had recorded, because I loved those stories and will never hear them again.  I would never be able to tell those stories the way he did.    I guess you could say, it still makes me sad when I think about Daddy’s dashed dreams.
            Last year, after pressing myself to write and post a blog entry with a target of 200 posts during the course of a year, I realised that I was blogging for the sake of blogging
            Before I became a missionary, I wrote an annual Christmas letter, with the usual things you put in an annual communique.  After joining Youth With A Mission (YWAM), I began writing newsletters/prayer updates on a quarterly basis.  I wrote them and posted/mailed them out in the traditional method.  As e-mail became more popular, I converted to sending out newsletters as an e-mail or attached as a document to my friends and supporters who preferred e-mail.
In 2000, while I was at college, I remembered hearing the word “blog” and wondered what a blog was and what it was all about.  In 2003, after moving to my current home, I realised that many YWAMers and other missionaries used blogs as a way to regularly contact and share with family, friends and supporters.  So, although I was now married and living in the UK, but no longer as a missionary, it occurred to me that a “web-log” would be a very efficient way to keep in touch with all the folk I knew and loved. 
            However, I also learned that many writers used blogs to build a following, earn a living and create a writing career.  So, I made an effort to use social media to build a following.  I didn’t feel I had much success.  To build a following, a writer needs to have a topic which with people feel a connection. 
For instance, I follow http://www.romantichistory.com/.  Sara is an accomplished seamstress/sewer and Sara’s blog is the showcase for the re-enactment costumes/clothes she makes.  Her sewing skills are amazing.  She shares about her children, but usually in context to the re-enactment events they attend and the clothing she has sewn for them. 
I found myself asking:  Do I want this to be biographical?  I could go that way.  After all, that is how Ann Marie "Ree" Drummond launched her career as a prolific blogger, book writer, cook, and entrepreneur.  Back in 2007 I came across her blog, and got addicted to the story of her romance and marriage to her husband.  Her website also included recipes, photographs and interesting updates about her life.  Today Ree is known as The Pioneer Woman, with a television series on The Food Network.  http://thepioneerwoman.com/
If I want this blog to be a launching pad for some sort of career, then how do I go about it?  If I know that I’m called to be a writer, and I am, then what am I supposed to be doing?  When am I supposed to do it?  How am I supposed to do it?    A year ago I was pondering all of this.  So, I decided that I should give my husband’s wise advice some attention.
What is ‘Maverick’s’ advice?  “Stop spending so much time writing a blog and work on your book.  You aren’t getting anywhere by blogging.” 
Back in 1994 I started a manuscript during the three month School of Writing, University of the Nations.  In 1995 I completed a manuscript, a historical romance.  As mentioned in a previous post, two critiques of the manuscript went missing. So That's What Happened
 I was advised that the story needed re-writing.  And since then, I’ve made several attempts at it—but never really knowing what to change. 
I asked one of my favourite authors, Donna Fletcher Crow, how she kept herself motivated. http://www.donnafletchercrow.com   Mrs. Fletcher Crow taught fiction writing at the School of Writing I attended.   Her advice was to do a detailed outline.  Practical, doable suggestion on her part.  Yet, all I knew about outlining was for thematic writing, with roman numbers. 
So I prayed.  I found myself on Amazon, and discovered that I could download a Kindle Reader onto my computer.  I’m sure there was Someone leading me, because I came across a workbook on outlining that I could download free.  The writer’s name is K.  M. M. Weiland.   How To Outline Your Novel
I bought the book, and ordered a paperback copy of the workbook.  I suddenly found myself unstuck.  I was so excited.  Since August I have been working on the reorganisation and rewriting of my first book.  The working title is Angelee’s Dilemma. 
Another book I came across is by Chandler Bolt entitled Book Launch.  It is about not only writing your first book, but also about self-publishing through Amazon. 
Christine Draper, one of my friends is self-publishing her books on Amazon.  She has been a valuable resource for me.  Her website is:  http://internetbusinesshandbook.com.Christine Draper Internet Business  You can find her books here: Books by Christine Draper

Over the past years, I believe writing the blog, editing a prayer magazine for my local parish and writing projects for Christine’s books has been helping me to mature and develop as a writer.  

Habakkuk 2:2-3 says:  Then the Lord replied: “Write down the revelation and make it plain on tablets so that a herald[b] may run with it.For the revelation awaits an appointed time; it speaks of the end and will not prove false.  Though it linger, wait for it; it[c] will certainly come and will not delay.

          I firmly believe that God has appointed times and seasons for us.  Although I have felt like I’ve been bumping my head against a wall over the years, I sense that my writing career would unfold at some point.  In the last few months, I have felt a release; that my season has come. 

            Now I will be launching my own website.  On my blog I will be sharing about the books, my research and even providing an excerpt from the book.  So, I will also be connecting my blog to my website. 

            I originally started blogging on www.wordpress.  I have reactivated that blog and will be posting here on www.blogger.com as well as www.wordpress. 
            Wasn’t that a long way of saying I’m back to blogging?  Thanks for your patience.  And thanks for reading.

“Lady Helene”



Thursday, 12 May 2016

Little things



          Little “happenings” during a 24 hour period can make a day special.  They become snap-shots in my mind that I can look back on in quiet moments and they serve to bring a smile to my face.

          With no car, I walk to the office,  where I work, and to St. Mary's, where I go to church.  I’ve taken to saying “Good Morning” or “Hello” to the people I pass on the way.  As I’ve been doing this over the last couple of months I have come to recognise the “regulars.”  


  • Young Asian Mums / Dads accompanying their princesses daughters and rambunctious sons to school;
  • A trio of ladies with a Lhasa Apso puppy;
  • Dave, doggy-daddy to two Jack Russell terriers (Cassie who is white and wire-haired, and Beau, a brown, smooth-coat.); 
  • the lady who rides the bicycle;
  • Polish grandmas on their way to mass at Holy Family Catholic church.

Another regular is Colleen.  Like me, she immigrated to the UK, only she is from the Caribbean.  Just about five-feet tall, and skin the colour of milk chocolate, Colleen’s colourful dress-sense belies that she is in her 70’s.  Her bright spirit is ageless, and her smile shines with joy.  After we had swapped “hello’s” a couple of times, one day, I added, “God bless you.”  She replied, “And God bless you too My Sister.”  More than once we have stopped a chatted a few minutes, to share words of blessings and learn each other’s name.  Twice a week she goes into town to volunteer as a prayer partner for a call-in prayer line.  It was just a little thing, a smiled greeting, which opened the door to friendship.


May Day Sunday I was on my way to church.  Trees had come into their green spring wardrobe, making shade for the pavement called “Green Drive”.  The pedestrian/bike path that connects two main roads was in good use by worshippers leaving the Catholic Church, dog walkers and others going to the shops for Sunday newspapers.  Once again, I was enjoying the warm, sunny day, greeting people along the way.  From most a smile and “Hello” was returned.  

As I neared Langley Road, I noticed a black woman chatting with her two sons-who looked to be young teen-agers.  They were walking in the opposite direction of the way I was going.  As I got near, I said, “Good Morning”.  She turned to me with a smile, and I heard “Africa” in her accented reply.  “Oh, yes, Good Morning Mama!”  She was a stranger, yet responded to my humble act of greeting.  She included me in her community.  Her culture acknowledged that my gray hair revealed my maturity and had called me by a name that gave me her respect.  That little thing flooded my heart with joy. 

Little things add value to other people’s lives as well.  In the 1990’s when returning home from my missionary travels, I would stay with my Mom.  We were very close, and had similar personalities.  One day we were eating lunch, watching the mid-day news.  One report highlighted the importance of meaningful touch for older people.  I remember touching Mom on the arm, but using one finger—more of a poke.  She looked at me and I explained, “I was giving you a meaningful touch.”  

It is nearly three years since Mom died.  I miss her.  So I appreciate my “adopted” Mum’s here.  These are ladies with whom I attend church.  I have made giving them a greeting and a hug an intentional action.  

On Mondays and Thursdays I see “Miss A.” when I get the newspaper for her from the shops.  It is important to me that I sit down and chat with her once I get there.  I often take Maisy with me, and “Miss A.” loves her.  “Miss A.” will often sing part of a song that she remembers, or tell me a little joke.  Giggles are normal.  I rarely stay for more than 45 to 50 minutes.  Before I leave, I give “Miss. A.” a big cuddle.  Sad to say, but according to her, I’m the only one who gives her hugs these days.  It takes little effort on my part, but it is a non-verbal way that I can show her how much I appreciate and enjoy her.  

Little actions add up over time and create something bigger than we can originally imagine.  For instance, everyday roots go deeper in the ground to find water and nutrients for the plants above the ground.  Some of those plants are trees that produce fruit and shade and beauty to be enjoyed.  We don’t realise what is happening on a daily basis.  Yet over weeks, months and even years the evidence of those consistent, little, hidden actions becomes apparent.  

I tend to forget that in order to get a big reaction, I need to repeatedly and consistently perform tasks that may have a small result individually, but a major result cumulatively.  

A genuine smile, accompanied by “Hi!” or “Good Morning.” might seem like nothing.  Yet, it is an invitation to connect.  The meaning of the action is: “I acknowledge you; I recognise you; you are worthwhile.”  The motive is to plant a seed in order to create a sense of community.  I become aware of the diverse cultures in my community, and develop a curiosity about the people who live in my area.  I may never know the majority of their names—but I am aware that God knows them.  And when I pass by the regulars, I am motivated to pray for them.  

Some of them will become acquaintances, having taken the time to stop and chat.  Depending upon what we chat about, I may respond, “I’ll pray for you.”  

Being blessed in so many way, I often berate myself because I don’t accomplish more, haven’t made “Big” differences in the world—like donating enough money and materials to build a school or hospital in a developing nation.  Yet, maybe what God really wants me to do is become good at doing the little things, incorporated with His love.  Because then it isn’t about me, it becomes about Him.   

Serving Jesus, Author of our faith,
"Lady Helene"

Monday, 2 May 2016

Giving things some thought



At Wittering Beach, 2007

          There is nothing like putting pressure on one’s self and wondering how much of the pressure is valid and how much is unrealistic. 
          In January I set a goal for myself to write 200 blog entries for the year.  In order to know how many posts I would need to do each week, I divided 200 by 52 weeks.  This number is 3.85 posts—rounded up to 4 posts a week.  At present I am 13 posts behind, that is 3 ¼ weeks behind schedule. 
          This brings me to asking some questions:
1.       How do I get on track with making 200 posts this year?  I could try doing two posts a day for three weeks.
2.     But I find myself asking: “Will I be posting for the sake of posting, just to make up the numbers?”
3.     What is my purpose for blogging? 
4.    Is it more important to meet a set target of blog posts—some of which will have no real significance, existing merely to meet a goal? 
5.     I want my posts to be meaningful.  But does every post have to have great meaning? 
6.    Is it better to forget a target and focus on writing pieces I have put considerable thought into? 
7.     Will I lose my impetus in writing regularly if I set aside the goal I set for myself?  Shouldn’t I keep reaching to achieve the 200, even if I don’t succeed?
8.     Is part of the reason that I’m not posting because I sometimes find that the day-to-day is so repetitive that it doesn’t bear telling about? 
9.    Should I be setting other goals, and these are goals I can be writing about?  For example, I love Great British Bake Off.  What if I make a list of the weekly challenges and then blog about what I baked?  For instance, one week the contestants bake biscuits/cookies and therefore I challenge myself to bake a recipe for biscuits I’ve never done before.  In that way I take you along on my journey.
In 1994 I found myself sitting in a classroom with several other people who were attending a three-month School of Writing.  The first couple of days the teacher laid foundations—not of grammar, syntax and punctuation.  Rather, learning how to focus one’s writing by asking the right questions before the writing begins.  Of the three main questions, two apply to this blog. 
1)      Who is my audience?
2)    What is my take-away?  (What is the main point I am trying to make?
3)    What format do I want to use—thematic or story-telling?      
As a blog, this allows me to write both thematic pieces and tell stories.   I can share a recipe, which is thematic (how-to).  I can also share anecdotes, which are short stories about events in my life.  And as a blog, both are appropriate.
So the two most important questions are, “Who is my audience?”  Logically, my audience consists of family and friends.  In either case, I keep wondering if I am making my blog posts interesting and relevant to them.  I occasionally get feedback, which does keep me motivated.  It also lets me know I am on track. 
Each time I sit down at my desk and power up my computer, I am asking myself: “What is the point of this piece? Do I want them to laugh at my cute Maisy?  Do I want them to try the recipe I shared?  Will they be able to understand, relate to, identify with the lessons I have learned?  If I ask myself these questions, then it affects how I write the piece, what I share in the story, who I write about and identify the people involved and also when I share something.
Although I know I have more readers than followers, one of the things I would love to accomplish is to increase the number of followers I have.  Right now the number is twelve.  I often wonder how other bloggers, whose blogs I read and follow, recruited over 100—even up to 1,000 followers.  Perhaps it is an ego thing to want to reach lots of people with what I write.  In one of the books I read about blogging, it said that one thing that helps create a following is to post on a regular basis.  But the draw for the reader must be reading worthwhile content. 
By setting myself the goal of writing 200 blog posts in 2016 I aspired to learn consistency, perseverance and discover a topic that I really enjoyed writing about. 
The Singleness Series seems to be attracting the most readers.  Some lessons I learned apply to everyone—whether single or married.  By writing about my single years, I want to present the mindset and struggles of people who are/have been single, yet yearn for companionship.  Therefore, it seems prudent to keep writing about it. 
Right now, catching up and posting 14 outstanding blogs entries seem impossible.  But I really think I need to push through, because finishing the task is a reward in itself.  I will put my mind to the task of writing, finding ways that will be meaningful as well as efficient.  I may not have all the answers right now…but because I believe that many of you are waiting and interested, I will press on.
Serving Jesus, Author of our faith,
“Lady Helene”